Pitching Forum
The Perfect Film Pitch in 7 Steps
17.06.2021

Do you have a great story to tell?

Do you wish to share it with the world, but don’t know exactly how? The road to making a film is long and very tricky, especially if you’re a beginner in the film industry. We can help you with that.

Pitching is often viewed as an art — an art you can master like any other. Pitching in the film industry involves a filmmaker, most of the times the writer, persuading studio executives, producers and investors to purchase their idea.

Because here at FEST – Pitching Forum we believe there’s no such thing as being “too prepared”, we’ve assembled 7 simple pointers to help you on your way to craft the perfect pitch.

 

  1. Research, research, research!

The first step to a good pitch is always finding out which one of the industry professionals is the best fit for your project. So, researching specific investors before pitching is a crucial part of the preparation. The main goal is to discover who may be best suited for your idea.  

Also, researching can help you make a pitch go way smoother. You’ll be more likely to start a conversation in a far more organic way, such as asking specific questions regarding the personality’s’ previous works.

 

  1. Collect comparable films

Comparable films are films similar to yours, in terms of their background, marketing and projected success. They’re not films that resemble yours creatively: pitching to potential money-backers is different than pitching to a like-minded filmmaker. You need to pitch your project like it’s a business.

Try to start by bringing up at least 5 to 10 comparable films. Be realistic: it’s very hard to make the case your film will be an Avengers-level success.  If you’re an indie filmmaker, perhaps you could read more about how Short Term 12 was made; if you’re a documentary proponent, try reading about The Painter and the Thief.

Choose recent films that you think your project is able to recreate in terms of success.

 

  1. Find the right people

If you have someone well known on your team or if you already possess a good network of contacts, you’ll be that much more likely to get a pitch meeting.

Well, but now you ask: what if you have none of those things? Try to get an actor/director on board who can bring some credibility to the project; doing this already proves that you are capable and qualified to follow up with your film ideas.

Remember, nobody will want to be the first to enter the project based on ideas only, everyone wants to get on a train that’s already on the move.

 

  1. Present a proof of concept

A proof of concept is a short film that serves to display what you are able create with the resources you presently possess and that, if done correctly, shows the potential investors how your feature film will look on screen.

Presenting a proof of concept can be a great way to pick your investors, producers or executives’ interest. Many well-known films started as a proof of concept that later turned into features.

 

  1. Prepare your pitch materials

According to industry professionals, these are the most coveted materials to solidify your pitch:

  • Copy of the script
  • Synopsis
  • Logline
  • Project Bible
  • Lookbook
  • Crew bios (producer, director, etc.)
  • Already gathered financiers
  • Budget
  • Cast
  • Director
  • Contact information

 

  1. Be engaging

During your pitch you obviously may be nervous, but always, always, be as engaging as you can. It’s crucial!

You want people to want to work with you. So, when in doubt of your behaviour, just show enthusiasm and try to make them feel the same passion you feel for the project.

 

  1. Follow up the contact

A small company may take 3/4 weeks to read your script; while a bigger company may take up to 6 months. If you want to obtain answers, just say politely “We’d love an answer by such and such a date, as we have a few offers.” – it might do the trick.

Don’t forget to keep them informed about your career or your next projects, and, more importantly, always stay polite, a “no” in the film industry may not represent the end.

 

***

 

Hopefully, the pointers we’ve provided have given you a better understanding of movie pitching and how to go about it properly. Now don’t forget to practice, rehearse, and practice again!

FEST – Pitching Forum is now looking for project applications. Don’t miss this chance of finding the best funding and/or perfect co-production partner.

Apply now!

  1.  Research, research, research!

The first step to a good pitch is always finding out which one of the industry professionals is the best fit for your project. So, researching specific investors before pitching is a crucial part of the preparation. The main goal is to discover who may be best suited for your idea.  

Also, researching can help you make a pitch go way smoother. You’ll be more likely to start a conversation in a far more organic way, such as asking specific questions regarding the personality’s’ previous works.

 

  1. Collect comparable films

Comparable films are films similar to yours, in terms of their background, marketing and – projected – success. They’re not films that resemble yours creatively: pitching to potential money-backers is different than pitching to a like-minded filmmaker. You need to pitch your project like it’s a business.

Try to start by bringing up at least 5 to 10 comparable films. Be realistic: it’s very hard to make the case your film will be an Avengers-level success.  If you’re an indie filmmaker, perhaps you could read more about how Short Term 12 was made; if you’re a documentary proponent, try reading about The Painter and the Thief.

Choose recent films that you think your project is able to recreate in terms of success.

 

  1. Find the right people

If you have someone well known on your team or if you already possess a good network of contacts, you’ll be that much more likely to get a pitch meeting.

Well, but now you ask: what if you have none of those things? Try to get an actor/director on board who can bring some credibility to the project; doing this already proves that you are capable and qualified to follow up with your film ideas.

Remember, nobody will want to be the first to enter the project based on ideas only, everyone wants to get on a train that’s already on the move.

 

  1. Present a proof of concept

A proof of concept is a short film that serves to display what you are able create with the resources you presently possess and that, if done correctly, shows the potential investors how your feature film will look on screen. Presenting a proof of concept can be a great way to pick your investors, producers or executives’ interest. Many well-known films started as a proof of concept that later turned into features.

 

  1. Prepare your pitch materials

According to industry professionals, these are the most coveted materials to solidify your pitch:

  • Copy of the script
  • Synopsis
  • Logline
  • Project Bible
  • Lookbook
  • Crew bios (producer, director, etc.)
  • Already gathered financiers
  • Budget
  • Cast
  • Director
  • Contact information

 

  1. Be engaging

During your pitch you obviously may be nervous, but always, always, be as engaging as you can. It’s crucial!

You want people to want to work with you. So, when in doubt of your behaviour, just show enthusiasm and try to make them feel the same passion you feel for the project.

 

  1. Follow up the contact

A small company may take 3/4 weeks to read your script; while a bigger company may take up to 6 months. If you want to obtain answers, just say politely “We’d love an answer by such and such a date, as we have a few offers.” – it might do the trick.

Don’t forget to keep them informed about your career or your next projects, and, more importantly, always stay polite, a “no” in the film industry may not represent the end.

--

 

Hopefully, the pointers we’ve provided have given you a better understanding of movie pitching and how to go about it properly. Now don’t forget to practice, rehearse, and practice again!

FEST – Pitching Forum is now looking for project applications. Don’t miss this chance of finding the best funding and/or perfect co-production partner.

Apply now!